GWOP University

"Art Study" by Kim Bell

Tag: Los Angeles

Hebru Brantley “No Foul” (2016)

Hebru Brantley piece from his 2016 collection.

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Biggie “CoJones” by Knowledge Bennett

Knowledge Bennett

Biggie “Cojones” , Silver (2014)

Size 48 inches x 84 inches

Medium Uniquely hand-pulled Silkscreen and acrylic on canvas 

The Know Contemporary (Los Angeles, CA)

photo: Kim Bell 📸

Hebru Brantley

Kerry James Marshall @ MOCA

This exhibition, Marshall’s first major retrospective in the United States, contains nearly 80 paintings, all of which contain images of Black subjects going about their daily business, presented with utter equality and humanity. A deeply accomplished artist, who makes ravishing paintings, Read the rest of this entry »

Cleon Peterson “Blood and Soil”

OTI gallery (Los Angeles, CA)

Extraordinary body of work by Los Angeles based artist Cleon Peterson.

With a strong interest in human conflict throughout history, Cleon’s new body of work reconciled violent history in comparison with present-day violence. Usually depicted through flat, collage-like compositions in which characters of different colors are engaging in physical, blood-thirsty clash, Read the rest of this entry »

Basquiat “Skull” (1982)

Many of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s paintings are in some way autobiographical, and Untitled may be considered a form of self-portraiture. The skull here exists somewhere between life and death. The eyes are listless, the face is sunken in, and the head looks lobotomized and subdued. Yet there are wild colors and spirited marks that suggest a surfeit of internal activity. Developing his own personal iconography, in this early work Basquiat both alludes to modernist appropriation of African masks and employs the mask as a means of exploring identity. Basquiat labored over this painting for months — evident in the worked surface and imagery — while most of his pieces were completed with bursts of energy over just a few days. The intensity of the painting, which was presented at his debut solo gallery exhibition in New York City, may also represent Basquiat’s anxieties surrounding the pressures of becoming a commercially successful artist.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

Mark Rothko (1957)

LACMA

Abstract Expressionist Mark Rothko is known for the hovering, shimmering fields of color in his mature paintings. White Center reflects his fascination with the emotional and visual power of the color red, which dominates his canvases of the 1950s and 1960s. The red rectangles suggest ritual and elemental associations (blood and fire, life and death), while an inner light appears to emanate from the white center, suggesting an ethereal, numinous glow. For Rothko, color was key to a spiritual realm, evoking transcendental truths that could not be expressed through recognizable imagery.

Photo: Kim Bell

Basquiat “Eyes and Eggs” (1983)

The Broad Museum

👀🍳🎨 Eyes and Eggs, arguably one of #Basquiat’s “simpler” canvases. The work is just a man, evidently a chef of sorts, holding up his pan of eggs, with his name tag reading “Joe”. He is staring at the viewer with so much intensity that one feels powerless. The piece stands as the reminder of the everyday moment that one never takes time to notice: the labor that goes unseen, the eggs that we eat without any gratitude for where they came from, and the consequences of such blind actions.

Photo: 📸 Kim Bell