GWOP University

"Art Study" by Kim Bell

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“Rusting Red Car in Kuau “ by Jean Michel Basquiat

Rusting Red Car in Kuau “ by Jean Michel Basquiat was executed in 1984 during one of #Basquiats jaunts to Hawaii, made obvious both from the painting’s title as well as the astute handling of color and line exhibited within the work. The paintings and drawings the artist completed while in Hawaii show exceptional precision and attention to detail, a characteristic made evident by the manner in which the red car is fully rendered as the focal point of the painting. The historical significance of this painting is threefold. In addition to the subject and origin of the work being of particular importance in the context of Basquiat’s career, Red Car in Kuau was completed around the time that Basquiat’s relationship with Andy #Warhol began to mature. Many speculate that this work is said to be in reference to Warhol’s car crash images of the 1960s. Red Car in Kuau is a preeminent example of Basquiat in conversation with Andy Warhol, preceding their formal collaboration, which began later that year. @diadetroit

#1984

Oil stick and oil on canvas

72 x 96 in .

Souvenir II by Kerry James Marshall

Souvenir II by Kerry James Marshall is set in Marshall’s aunt’s living room where a memorial hangs above the couch. The memorial reads “In Memory of” and features President John F. Kennedy, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, and centered between the Kennedys is Martin Luther King, Jr. In clouds floating above, Marshall depicts – as angels – individuals associated with the Civil Rights Movement who were violently killed between 1959–1970. The most prominent part of the work is that of a black angel with gold wings, preparing the living room’s memorial setting, holding a vase with flowers, inviting the viewer into the scene. Souvenir II is one of four in a series, narrating the loss of leaders in politics, literature, arts and music.

Among the angels depicted in the clouds is Detroit native Viola Liuzzo, a housewife and 39-year-old mother of five. She was shot by Ku Klux Klan night riders on Highway 80 in Montgomery, Alabama making her way home to Detroit after participating in the Selma to Montgomery marches in the wake of Bloody Sunday. To this day, she is known as the only white woman killed during the Civil Rights Movement. The other angels in the artwork include Medgar Evers, Fred Hampton, Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Malcolm X and others who were murdered for their work during the Civil Rights Movement.

Cleon Peterson “Blood and Soil”

OTI gallery (Los Angeles, CA)

Extraordinary body of work by Los Angeles based artist Cleon Peterson.

With a strong interest in human conflict throughout history, Cleon’s new body of work reconciled violent history in comparison with present-day violence. Usually depicted through flat, collage-like compositions in which characters of different colors are engaging in physical, blood-thirsty clash, Read the rest of this entry »

Vincent Van Gogh “Self-Portrait” (1887)

Detroit Institute Of Arts

“For want of a better model,” Van Gogh chose to paint his own portrait on many occasions. While in Paris between 1886 and 1888, Van Gogh lightened his palette under the influence of the brilliant colors of the impressionists, but he soon reserved the use of such light colors to express particular moods. Van Gogh’s stay in Paris was a relatively happy one, and in this painting, created during the summer of 1887, he portrays himself with an almost light-hearted appearance. This image above is located at the Detroit Institute Of Arts in Detroit,MI and was the first Van Gogh painting acquired in the United States. Van Gogh was one of the modern masters but didn’t receive his credit until he died.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

Basquiat “Skull” (1982)

Many of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s paintings are in some way autobiographical, and Untitled may be considered a form of self-portraiture. The skull here exists somewhere between life and death. The eyes are listless, the face is sunken in, and the head looks lobotomized and subdued. Yet there are wild colors and spirited marks that suggest a surfeit of internal activity. Developing his own personal iconography, in this early work Basquiat both alludes to modernist appropriation of African masks and employs the mask as a means of exploring identity. Basquiat labored over this painting for months — evident in the worked surface and imagery — while most of his pieces were completed with bursts of energy over just a few days. The intensity of the painting, which was presented at his debut solo gallery exhibition in New York City, may also represent Basquiat’s anxieties surrounding the pressures of becoming a commercially successful artist.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell