GWOP University

"Art Study" by Kim Bell

Tag: detroit institute of Arts

“Rusting Red Car in Kuau “ by Jean Michel Basquiat

Rusting Red Car in Kuau “ by Jean Michel Basquiat was executed in 1984 during one of #Basquiats jaunts to Hawaii, made obvious both from the painting’s title as well as the astute handling of color and line exhibited within the work. The paintings and drawings the artist completed while in Hawaii show exceptional precision and attention to detail, a characteristic made evident by the manner in which the red car is fully rendered as the focal point of the painting. The historical significance of this painting is threefold. In addition to the subject and origin of the work being of particular importance in the context of Basquiat’s career, Red Car in Kuau was completed around the time that Basquiat’s relationship with Andy #Warhol began to mature. Many speculate that this work is said to be in reference to Warhol’s car crash images of the 1960s. Red Car in Kuau is a preeminent example of Basquiat in conversation with Andy Warhol, preceding their formal collaboration, which began later that year. @diadetroit

#1984

Oil stick and oil on canvas

72 x 96 in .

Souvenir II by Kerry James Marshall

Souvenir II by Kerry James Marshall is set in Marshall’s aunt’s living room where a memorial hangs above the couch. The memorial reads “In Memory of” and features President John F. Kennedy, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, and centered between the Kennedys is Martin Luther King, Jr. In clouds floating above, Marshall depicts – as angels – individuals associated with the Civil Rights Movement who were violently killed between 1959–1970. The most prominent part of the work is that of a black angel with gold wings, preparing the living room’s memorial setting, holding a vase with flowers, inviting the viewer into the scene. Souvenir II is one of four in a series, narrating the loss of leaders in politics, literature, arts and music.

Among the angels depicted in the clouds is Detroit native Viola Liuzzo, a housewife and 39-year-old mother of five. She was shot by Ku Klux Klan night riders on Highway 80 in Montgomery, Alabama making her way home to Detroit after participating in the Selma to Montgomery marches in the wake of Bloody Sunday. To this day, she is known as the only white woman killed during the Civil Rights Movement. The other angels in the artwork include Medgar Evers, Fred Hampton, Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Malcolm X and others who were murdered for their work during the Civil Rights Movement.

Mickalene Thomas (2008)

Mickalene Thomas (b. 1971)

“Something You Can Feel, 2008”

rhinestone, acrylic paint, and oil enamel on wood panels 96 x 120 in.

Acquired by Detroit Institute of Arts (2015-present)

photo: Kim Bell

Diego Rivera “Detroit Industry” mural

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

Frank Stella (1983)

Frank Stella, in full Frank Philip Stella, (born May 12, 1936, Malden, Massachusetts, U.S.), American painter who began as a leading figure in the Minimalist art movement and later became known for his irregularly shaped works and large-scale multimedia reliefs.

Frank Stella works are influenced by Jasper Johns, Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, Franz Kline and Caravaggio. This 3 D Stella pictured above is one of my favorite paintings at the Detroit Institute Of Arts museum.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

William de Kooning (1959)

Detroit Institute Of Arts

Unlike his contemporaries Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko, de Kooning’s paintings refer to natural forms and specific places or events, pushed into pure abstraction by his reliance on color and the deep build-up of paint to create form. Depth and perspective are subordinated to the flattening effects of his slashing, violent brushwork. Some of the “abstract landscapes” from 1957 to 1963 are based on the landscape around Long Island Sound, including Merritt Parkway, a local highway. Speed is suggested by the controlled thrusts of the brush while the naturalistic palette conveys the crisscross of the road through the landscape.

Photo: 📸 Kim Bell