GWOP University

"Art Study" by Kim Bell

Tag: creativity

Mickalene Thomas (2008)

Mickalene Thomas (b. 1971)

“Something You Can Feel, 2008”

rhinestone, acrylic paint, and oil enamel on wood panels 96 x 120 in.

Acquired by Detroit Institute of Arts (2015-present)

photo: Kim Bell

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Biggie “CoJones” by Knowledge Bennett

Knowledge Bennett

Biggie “Cojones” , Silver (2014)

Size 48 inches x 84 inches

Medium Uniquely hand-pulled Silkscreen and acrylic on canvas 

The Know Contemporary (Los Angeles, CA)

photo: Kim Bell 📸

Yayoi Kusama

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

Hebru Brantley

Last Supper by Johan Andersson (2015)

Johan Andersson b. 1986

Last Supper, 2015

Oil on canvas

72 x 144 x 2 in.

Darts That Cut Black by Barry Oretsky (1989)

Barry Oretsky
B. 1946
Darts That Cut Black (1989)
Acrylic on canvas
46 x 62 inches
Provenance
For sale : $40,000

Frank Stella (1983)

Frank Stella, in full Frank Philip Stella, (born May 12, 1936, Malden, Massachusetts, U.S.), American painter who began as a leading figure in the Minimalist art movement and later became known for his irregularly shaped works and large-scale multimedia reliefs.

Frank Stella works are influenced by Jasper Johns, Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, Franz Kline and Caravaggio. This 3 D Stella pictured above is one of my favorite paintings at the Detroit Institute Of Arts museum.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

Max Beckmann “Self Portrait”

Beckmann often represented himself in disguise or costumed to express his own view that life is a series of roles to be played. In this late self-portrait, the artist seems to have shed disguise: unsmiling, he stands plainly dressed, close behind an easel. The figure is rendered in the strong black outlines characteristic of Beckmann’s rather flat painting style. Tight space presses in around the figure, conveying a claustrophobic sense that underscores Beckmann’s physical presence and close proximity. His gaze is challenging, but it also creates a sense of immediacy in its directness.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

Vincent Van Gogh “Self-Portrait” (1887)

Detroit Institute Of Arts

“For want of a better model,” Van Gogh chose to paint his own portrait on many occasions. While in Paris between 1886 and 1888, Van Gogh lightened his palette under the influence of the brilliant colors of the impressionists, but he soon reserved the use of such light colors to express particular moods. Van Gogh’s stay in Paris was a relatively happy one, and in this painting, created during the summer of 1887, he portrays himself with an almost light-hearted appearance. This image above is located at the Detroit Institute Of Arts in Detroit,MI and was the first Van Gogh painting acquired in the United States. Van Gogh was one of the modern masters but didn’t receive his credit until he died.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

Basquiat “Skull” (1982)

Many of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s paintings are in some way autobiographical, and Untitled may be considered a form of self-portraiture. The skull here exists somewhere between life and death. The eyes are listless, the face is sunken in, and the head looks lobotomized and subdued. Yet there are wild colors and spirited marks that suggest a surfeit of internal activity. Developing his own personal iconography, in this early work Basquiat both alludes to modernist appropriation of African masks and employs the mask as a means of exploring identity. Basquiat labored over this painting for months — evident in the worked surface and imagery — while most of his pieces were completed with bursts of energy over just a few days. The intensity of the painting, which was presented at his debut solo gallery exhibition in New York City, may also represent Basquiat’s anxieties surrounding the pressures of becoming a commercially successful artist.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell