GWOP University

"Art Study" by Kim Bell

Tag: creativity

Souvenir II by Kerry James Marshall

Souvenir II by Kerry James Marshall is set in Marshall’s aunt’s living room where a memorial hangs above the couch. The memorial reads “In Memory of” and features President John F. Kennedy, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, and centered between the Kennedys is Martin Luther King, Jr. In clouds floating above, Marshall depicts – as angels – individuals associated with the Civil Rights Movement who were violently killed between 1959–1970. The most prominent part of the work is that of a black angel with gold wings, preparing the living room’s memorial setting, holding a vase with flowers, inviting the viewer into the scene. Souvenir II is one of four in a series, narrating the loss of leaders in politics, literature, arts and music.

Among the angels depicted in the clouds is Detroit native Viola Liuzzo, a housewife and 39-year-old mother of five. She was shot by Ku Klux Klan night riders on Highway 80 in Montgomery, Alabama making her way home to Detroit after participating in the Selma to Montgomery marches in the wake of Bloody Sunday. To this day, she is known as the only white woman killed during the Civil Rights Movement. The other angels in the artwork include Medgar Evers, Fred Hampton, Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Malcolm X and others who were murdered for their work during the Civil Rights Movement.

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Mickalene Thomas (2008)

Mickalene Thomas (b. 1971)

“Something You Can Feel, 2008”

rhinestone, acrylic paint, and oil enamel on wood panels 96 x 120 in.

Acquired by Detroit Institute of Arts (2015-present)

photo: Kim Bell

Biggie “CoJones” by Knowledge Bennett

Knowledge Bennett

Biggie “Cojones” , Silver (2014)

Size 48 inches x 84 inches

Medium Uniquely hand-pulled Silkscreen and acrylic on canvas 

The Know Contemporary (Los Angeles, CA)

photo: Kim Bell 📸

Yayoi Kusama

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

Hebru Brantley

Last Supper by Johan Andersson (2015)

Johan Andersson b. 1986

Last Supper, 2015

Oil on canvas

72 x 144 x 2 in.

Darts That Cut Black by Barry Oretsky (1989)

Barry Oretsky
B. 1946
Darts That Cut Black (1989)
Acrylic on canvas
46 x 62 inches
Provenance
For sale : $40,000

Frank Stella (1983)

Frank Stella, in full Frank Philip Stella, (born May 12, 1936, Malden, Massachusetts, U.S.), American painter who began as a leading figure in the Minimalist art movement and later became known for his irregularly shaped works and large-scale multimedia reliefs.

Frank Stella works are influenced by Jasper Johns, Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, Franz Kline and Caravaggio. This 3 D Stella pictured above is one of my favorite paintings at the Detroit Institute Of Arts museum.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

Max Beckmann “Self Portrait”

Beckmann often represented himself in disguise or costumed to express his own view that life is a series of roles to be played. In this late self-portrait, the artist seems to have shed disguise: unsmiling, he stands plainly dressed, close behind an easel. The figure is rendered in the strong black outlines characteristic of Beckmann’s rather flat painting style. Tight space presses in around the figure, conveying a claustrophobic sense that underscores Beckmann’s physical presence and close proximity. His gaze is challenging, but it also creates a sense of immediacy in its directness.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

Vincent Van Gogh “Self-Portrait” (1887)

Detroit Institute Of Arts

“For want of a better model,” Van Gogh chose to paint his own portrait on many occasions. While in Paris between 1886 and 1888, Van Gogh lightened his palette under the influence of the brilliant colors of the impressionists, but he soon reserved the use of such light colors to express particular moods. Van Gogh’s stay in Paris was a relatively happy one, and in this painting, created during the summer of 1887, he portrays himself with an almost light-hearted appearance. This image above is located at the Detroit Institute Of Arts in Detroit,MI and was the first Van Gogh painting acquired in the United States. Van Gogh was one of the modern masters but didn’t receive his credit until he died.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell