GWOP University

"Art Study" by Kim Bell

Tag: art history

Ed Ruscha “Heavy Industry” (1962)

Ed Ruscha (b. December 16, 1937) in Omaha, Nebraska.

One of the most important postwar artists, Ed Ruscha came into prominence during the 1960s pop art movement. First recognized for his associations to graphic design and commercial art, Ruscha became admired for his meditations on word and image. Working in a variety of media and taking the environment of Los Angeles as a guide, Ruscha creates candid, comic presentations of familiar ideas and locations that continue to impact contemporary art.

Heavy Industry
1962
oil and pencil on canvas
67 x 71 5/8 in. (170.18 x 181.93 cm)
📸 by Kim Bell
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Franz Kline “Siskind” (1958)

Like his friend Willem de Kooning, Kline used abstraction to commemorate specific people, places, or events. Dynamic line and powerful brushstrokes loaded with paint reduce his compositions to a few large forms. Both the white and black areas seem to project from the work with equal force; this dramatic surface tension releases and yet controls the energy of his process. Kline’s dialogue of black and white in Siskind evokes the abstract photographs of Aaron Siskind, his close friend, to whom this work is dedicated.

📸 Kim bell

Last Supper by Johan Andersson (2015)

Johan Andersson b. 1986

Last Supper, 2015

Oil on canvas

72 x 144 x 2 in.

Darts That Cut Black by Barry Oretsky (1989)

Barry Oretsky
B. 1946
Darts That Cut Black (1989)
Acrylic on canvas
46 x 62 inches
Provenance
For sale : $40,000

“Lot Fleeing From Sodom” Benjamin West (1810)

“Lot Fleeing from Sodom “ 🔥 by #BenjaminWest 🎨 #1810 oil painting on panel owned by Detroit Institute Of Arts.

This is an original oil painting of Lot fleeing his city of #Sodom as #GOD⚡️ destroys the Valley area 🔥 where people are living wicked with vice.

Kerry James Marshall @ MOCA

This exhibition, Marshall’s first major retrospective in the United States, contains nearly 80 paintings, all of which contain images of Black subjects going about their daily business, presented with utter equality and humanity. A deeply accomplished artist, who makes ravishing paintings, Read the rest of this entry »

Andy Warhol “Karen Kain” (1980)

Cranbrook Art Museum

Karen Kain is a Canadian ballet dancer who trained at the National Ballet School of Canada. She later became the artistic director at the National Ballet School of Canada. This screenprint is based off a photograph of the dancer. The portrait is embellished with blocks of vibrant yellows, oranges, purples and blues.

The Karen Kain portrait is a colored screen print created with diamond dust on Lenox museum board in 1980. Karen Kain captivated Warhol as she did to audiences around the world who watched her as a principal ballet dancer in the National Ballet of Canada. The screen print was based off of a Polaroid taken by Warhol in his famed studio, The Factory.

Frank Stella (1983)

Frank Stella, in full Frank Philip Stella, (born May 12, 1936, Malden, Massachusetts, U.S.), American painter who began as a leading figure in the Minimalist art movement and later became known for his irregularly shaped works and large-scale multimedia reliefs.

Frank Stella works are influenced by Jasper Johns, Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, Franz Kline and Caravaggio. This 3 D Stella pictured above is one of my favorite paintings at the Detroit Institute Of Arts museum.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

Vincent Van Gogh “Self-Portrait” (1887)

Detroit Institute Of Arts

“For want of a better model,” Van Gogh chose to paint his own portrait on many occasions. While in Paris between 1886 and 1888, Van Gogh lightened his palette under the influence of the brilliant colors of the impressionists, but he soon reserved the use of such light colors to express particular moods. Van Gogh’s stay in Paris was a relatively happy one, and in this painting, created during the summer of 1887, he portrays himself with an almost light-hearted appearance. This image above is located at the Detroit Institute Of Arts in Detroit,MI and was the first Van Gogh painting acquired in the United States. Van Gogh was one of the modern masters but didn’t receive his credit until he died.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell

Basquiat “Skull” (1982)

Many of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s paintings are in some way autobiographical, and Untitled may be considered a form of self-portraiture. The skull here exists somewhere between life and death. The eyes are listless, the face is sunken in, and the head looks lobotomized and subdued. Yet there are wild colors and spirited marks that suggest a surfeit of internal activity. Developing his own personal iconography, in this early work Basquiat both alludes to modernist appropriation of African masks and employs the mask as a means of exploring identity. Basquiat labored over this painting for months — evident in the worked surface and imagery — while most of his pieces were completed with bursts of energy over just a few days. The intensity of the painting, which was presented at his debut solo gallery exhibition in New York City, may also represent Basquiat’s anxieties surrounding the pressures of becoming a commercially successful artist.

Photo 📸 Kim Bell